Why Should We Go to Church?

Be on guard for yourselves and for all the flock, among which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers, to shepherd the church of God which He purchased with His own blood. – (Acts 20:28, NASB)

In this modern day and age, there are so many different types of churches and denominations that the actual Word of God can get lost very quickly. We are in a day where churches do everything to interest newcomers: some have espresso carts in the lobby, some have full musical performances for their “worship” services, and others just try to entice you with friendly faces and special programs.

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Hopefully your church doesn’t look like this. (Photo by Thibault Trillet on Pexels.com)

Isn’t Church Just a Big Hangout Spot?

When I first started this blog, I didn’t actually go to church. My family attended church when I was much younger, and I attended private school for kindergarten into 1st grade but, not long after that, we stopped everything. I do recall attending church (or at least, sunday school and AWANA) with my neighbor when they babysat me, and I didn’t like it  at all. When I got older, I knew that the Bible said that I should go to church, but I held a great distrust of many churches for the type of material that they teach. My favorite “church” was really just a conference of speakers, elderly men, that was almost antiquated in its simplicity.

Why would that have been my favorite? I trusted what they were preaching. I don’t like churches that do not proclaim the Word of God. I don’t like churches who partially portray the Word of God. I don’t like churches who sugar coat what they are saying to make it pleasing to the ears.

So, perhaps it is out of a general distrust, perhaps it is secretly underwritten by a dose of pride, and perhaps it is just out of a lack of availability that I hadn’t found a church that I actually wanted to attend. But more so, apart from the actual biblical command to go to church, I didn’t see a reason for it. One of the churches I briefly attended prayed before the offering, as most do, and the whole prayer sounded like a plea for donations. Right or wrong, this led me to think, “If you truly trust God to provide, why are you begging your congregation for money?

This brings me to a few days ago, when I was sitting in church during the graduation service. Not the graduation where diplomas are handed out, but a special service congratulating the high school and college graduates and giving a special prayer for their lives going forward.

At that moment, it dawned on me that I finally understood what church is for.

Now, anyone should immediately know that church is for coming together, honoring God, worshipping Him, and fellowshipping with other believers. That part never alluded me.

Then, what more is there? – You may be asking.

Understanding Church

I had an entirely wrong attitude about church, as I think many other Christians or would-be Christians (let alone, atheists and agnostics) have. Many people, myself included, viewed church almost as this place where you go and put on a front for other believers.

It’s the place for people who call themselves Christian to go hang out and gossip with and about other people who call themselves Christian (or not). They pass around the offering plate, maybe they do some social programs, a few youth group activities, and perhaps the pastor lives in a nice house.

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And if you’re Joel Osteen, you live in a really nice “house”. (Photo by Mikes Photos on Pexels.com)

All the while, I was missing the fact that this is not what church is all about. Not even close. And it definitely isn’t about “becoming the best you”, “diversity” or “tolerance”. Before you shake your fist at me or write an angry comment, it’s not to say that none of those things have a place within any given church, but that’s simply not what the church is for

My dad and I went to an organ restoration concert at a church we’d never gone to before that is part of a denomination whose churches we never attend, but we didn’t really know a whole lot about either. Needless to say, I don’t feel inclined to know any more than what I learned that day.

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Amidst the beautiful organ music, played by accomplished organist Dan Miller, they sang a few hymns. One or two of them were well known, classic hymns such as Holy Holy Holy, and I was fine with that. Towards the end though, the songs started becoming about diversity, acceptance, and even singing multiple times about the organ itself. There’s nothing inherently wrong with true diversity, true acceptance, true tolerance, or the instrument that all this music was being played on. But apart from the fact that this was not about true diversity, acceptance, love, or tolerance, we were supposed to be singing worship songs! Why on earth would we want to worship any of these social issues, regardless what you believe about them?

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The True Purpose of Church

A while back, I was listening to the radio and there was a woman’s program on, and she was talking about a woman who had brought concerns to her about not having time to minister. Basically, the woman’s predicament was this –

I have to be a wife to my husband and a mother to my children, I just don’t have the time to go out and minister to people and be a good witness as I’m called to be. What do I do?

The woman hosting the show gently advised that the woman was already being a witness for God, through being a good wife and mother. Remember, as we’ve talked about before, everything not done in faith, is sin. Doing something in faith doesn’t automatically make it good, but doing something not in faith automatically makes it sinful. Hence, why we need Christ in the first place!

In essence, as long as the woman with the dilemma was being the best wife and mother she could be, by the grace of God, depending on Him, and raising up her children to know and love God, she was being a witness for Him.

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters,Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters – (Colossians 3:23, NIV)

OK, but what does that have to do with church?

Do you remember how Jesus said, “the Sabbath is for man”? Well, church is for man too, to the glory of God the Father.

Are you still with me?

A Community of Believers Worshipping Jesus

I realized, while sitting there at the graduation service, that the church body wasn’t just a group of people from the same city as me who liked taking time out of their Sunday to sing some songs and hear a guy speak.

That isn’t to say that no one who attends church is attending for those simple reasons, but it’s not the true, core meaning.

Church is about a community of believers, worshipping Christ together, and supporting one another in faith and in life. It was when it hit me that we were sitting here, having a separate graduation service from the one their school held for them, to congratulate all these kids and pray for their future.

  • Someone had taken the time out to write up interview questions for each of these kids.
  • Someone had taken the time out to make record each of these kids walking around and partaking in their favorite activities.
  • Someone had taken the time out to edit each of those videos to make them professional-looking.
  • Someone had taken time out to make a separate flyer to hand out with the bulletin.
  • Someone had taken the time and money to purchase books to give as gifts to each of the graduates.
  • Someone had taken the time out to compose a prayer for these graduates and write up a few words to say to each of them personally.
  • And lastly, the whole congregation was together as a church family to watch the videos, hear the words, pray the prayers, and congratulate each of these kids.

A whole separate graduation program for the church body to show their support for these kids!

It wasn’t necessary – they already had or would have a graduation ceremony from their school. They were the kids of one of the parents, but they weren’t my kids, or the pastor’s kids, or the kids of the other deacons, or the kids of the music director. . . Really, outside of church I didn’t know any of them. The majority of the church was not technically related in any way.

Yet, we were all sitting together, in support of them.

Although, biologically, I have no relation whatsoever, they are brothers and sisters in Christ. They are children of brothers and sisters in Christ. The whole church body is related through Christ.

Working Together for God’s Glory

As a church family, as a church body, as a church congregation, we are like our own separate community. We are a community of believers, working together to support other believers. We are working as the hands and feet of Christ. We are loving each other in Christ. As the body of believers, we make up the bride of Christ.

In an almost twisted way, it’s kind of like what people envision “real” communism or socialism to be. We are supposed to pay in (tithe) because it’s all God’s money anyways, and the church uses it to redistribute the wealth to those in need and pay the pastoral staff for their services.

It’s not communism or socialism because, first and foremost, no one is forced to give up their wealth or possessions. Biblical tithing can only be done as a willful act of faith based on the promise that God will provide for your needs.  Biblical tithing is also a minimum of 10% whereas communism or socialism would forcibly take whatever percentage they chose up to 100% with the promise that the government would then provide for your needs, which generally results in poverty for all.

The Real Reason for Church

Church is where all the believers commune together to benefit and support each other as a community, to the glory of God the Father. We learn about Christ together, we worship Him together, and we support and love (including holding accountable) each other because of faith in Him. God is glorified when we do that.

If you are skeptical towards attending church, or have attended church before and were turned off by the experience, I would urge you to pray and try again. Seek out a church that puts Jesus Christ first and foremost. Pray for guidance in finding that church. God didn’t give us the gift of the church body so we could get free coffee. God didn’t give us the gift of the church body so that we could listen to fun music, or learn new skills in church that we didn’t have an opportunity to learn elsewhere. We have the gift of the church body so that we can work synonomously together as the bride of Christ to ultimately become one with Him.

But, I’m a Good Person!

And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good except God alone.” – (Luke 18:19, NIV)

There is a belief that has been around probably since the beginning of time, that generally goes as follows:

I should be able to go to heaven because overall, I’m a good person.

It seems logical enough, doesn’t it? A good many people seem to believe this, if the internet is any indication. I’d like to hope that isn’t the reality, but the internet spans quite a number of people so I’d be inclined to wonder…

The idea is that if we are generally “good”, then we ought to be allowed entrance into heaven. We shouldn’t be turned away, and we certainly shouldn’t be subjected to an eternity of torment. The question is, how do we determine what qualifies as “good”, and what then qualifies as “good enough” – to get into heaven?

Well, so far we’ve touched on this point in a roundabout way a few times now, but I figured I’d do one more post to really spell it out, just in case.

There are a couple problems with this line of thinking. It’s easy to see how many people struggle with it because of all sorts of methodologies devised to avoid it. For example, many believe that everyone can work their way into heaven with enough good deeds, or maybe enough good deeds to outweigh the bad in a sort of 60/40 mindset. Others believe that God sent Christ to die for all people, therefore everyone who isn’t evil or wicked will be saved. You know, not the really bad guys but – everyone else. Some believe that Christ died for all people and therefore everyone will be saved regardless.

It’s fascinating to me that many people hold a strong objection toward the idea of needing to believe in Christ in order to be saved. That is, they will accept that He saved them – as long as it applies regardless of whether or not they choose to believe in Him. Oftentimes, it goes back to an argument such as this: I am a good person, so Christ’s death should save me also, even if I don’t believe in Him, if God is all-loving.

Now, I have never heard any one person use that specific argument. However, I’ve known of many people who have a general belief that if God is all-loving, He must save them too regardless of what or who they do or don’t believe in. He must save everyone, except those really evil people!

Well, we are again brought back to a point of, “Who determines what is good?” and, “Who determines what is evil?” and furthermore, “Who determines what qualifies as good enough to enter heaven?” This is where it comes back to the original argument – Well, I’m better than these people, or these people, or even most Christians I’ve met! Should I rather be like you – bigoted and hypocritical?? 

Ouch.

I haven’t heard that particular argument said to me directly, but I’ve seen a variation of it and heard the gist of it before. Sometimes not with the last part, but almost always with the first.

Now, sometimes people will go back to the 10 Commandments, or the golden rule. That is, don’t murder, don’t steal, don’t lie, treat others the way you wish to be treated… So if they keep those, they are good, right? They overlook all the other commandments, but that is not the point. Some people will also throw in other characteristics that aren’t listed – ones that they may even accuse many Christians of being, but that they don’t consider themselves to be – bigoted, judgmental, sexist, homophobic, etc. So what’s the problem with that person? He or she is clearly a “good” person, and may even be a better person than me! I should be the one ashamed and they should definitely be the one to enter heaven.

But, again. What qualifies as “good enough”? Why is it that we Christians think we are somehow good enough to be qualified to enter heaven, yet we think that these other people who are maybe even more morally upright than us, somehow aren’t? How can we be so utterly arrogant as to make such an implication?

Well, we aren’t “good enough”.

But, how then can we claim that we will go to heaven? How can we possibly claim that we are going to go to heaven and everyone else will go to an eternity of torment?! That’s ludicrous to suggest, right? What arrogance!

Now on the other hand, someone might see a Christian who is truly a living witness. They are living as Christ lived. Meeting them is almost as though you are meeting Christ face-to-face. Well, they should be good enough, right? Granted all Christians are called to be living witnesses, yet not so many are – and I do not exempt myself from that at all. I am absolutely not the living witness I should be. But, I and many people can see that my dad is like that. He is still goofy and silly, but at his heart he has many Christ-like qualities. And everyone who knows him, loves him, and appreciates all he does. So, going back to the idea of being good enough, am I suggesting that my dad would not even qualify? Is he not good enough to get into heaven??

No. He’s not.

How can I say that? How then do I qualify what is good enough?!

Well, that’s the question at hand, isn’t it? What is good, and what then is good enough? Well, I don’t decide what is good, let alone what constitutes good enough. God does. It’s His heaven. I am not the judge of who goes in, He is. That said, none of us are the judge of who enters, only Him. Only He can say who is good enough to enter heaven. But, this brings us back to the original argument, “Well, He should think me good enough since I am not like all these other people!”

Do you know the real heart of the matter? It’s pride.

Pride tells us that we should be good enough, pride tells us that we should be able to work our way into heaven. Pride tells us that at some point, we should be deemed good enough unless we know we’re really bad. Now, I can’t say, “And that’s fine,” but I can say that it’s understandable because we are all proud.

Now, with this idea one might be inclined to say, “I’m not proud! I don’t walk around all cocky like so-and-so! I am not a narcissist!” I know that I would certainly be saying that myself if someone just claimed that I was proud! I would say there’s no way. In fact, I’m largely self-defeating – isn’t that the polar opposite of pride? I put myself down and see where I fail more often than I build myself up and see where I succeed. How can that be prideful?

Well, this is where our human definition is different from God’s definition. And deep down, we are all proud. We don’t want to admit it, and we, like myself, often may not even see it. But it’s there. Pride is what makes us want to be like gods. Not in the fashion of Zeus or some other false god, but rather in the characteristics that God holds. He is not accountable to anyone. He is not dependent on anyone. He is (literally) better than everyone else. He makes the choices. He has the final decisions. He says, “This will happen this way,” and it does. He is worthy of respect, glory, honor, and praise. He issues rewards and punishments. He knows literally everything.

What God says goes, every time.

Now, think for a minute with me. Regardless of how mopey we might feel at times, regardless of how self-loathing we might feel at times, or regardless of how good we feel about ourselves at times, let’s look at these characteristics.

  • When was the last time you wanted to be treated with respect, if not demanding it?
  • When was the last time that you wanted to be or feel independent of others?
  • When was the last time that you thought, in some way, that you were better than someone else?
  • When was the last time that you wanted to have the final say on a particular decision?
  • When was the last time that you – secretly or openly – wanted recognition or praise for something you’d said, done, or even just how you are?
  • When was the last time you wanted to tell someone what to do?
  • When was the last time that you thought you knew how to handle a particular situation better than someone else did?

Is it possible that you wanted one or more of those…today? Yesterday? Within the week? Have you ever felt like that? This is where pride really rears its ugly head, because even when you seem the opposite of proud, you can almost certainly agree with one or more of those above points. This is where I am convicted! I frequently use self-defeating humor and often I feel what seems to be the opposite of proud. And yet, when it comes down to it – boy, do I ever get angry when someone cuts me off in traffic, or tailgates, or when someone gets recognition for something good that I said or did at work!

How dare they?! Who do they think they are?!

Have you ever had a thought like that? What follows that line of thinking? We sometimes stop there – accusing the other person of thinking that they are so high and mighty. Yet, underlying that is frequently, if not always, a thought that they are doing it to us. We “do not deserve“to be treated that way!

Consider when we see someone cut someone else off in traffic. Or speed excessively. Or run a red light. What’s our reaction then? When it isn’t happening to us directly, we might have a similar reaction of “Who does that person think they are?” or “Gee, they think they own the road, don’t they?” but we typically won’t get fuming mad if it is happening to someone else. Why is that? Why don’t we get just as mad to see it happening to someone else as we get when it happens to us? Or, alternatively, why don’t we stay as calm when it happens to us as we do when it happens to others?

More so, why don’t we hold ourselves to the same standard? If we are getting tailgated, we might get furious at the person doing it. We might do things like slow down to make them angrier (guilty…) or make a (hopefully not) obscene gesture at them, depending on how well we can keep our calm. But, if we are tailgating someone, well, we have a reason for it. We are trying to get somewhere! It’s important! THE BANK CLOSES IN 10 MINUTES, CAN’T YOU GO ANY FASTER?!

Again, it’s because when it happens to us, the perception is that we are being slighted. It is almost like a sort of personal attack, offense, or insult against us! But when we do it to others, we justify our behavior. We have reasons for it. And if someone gets mad at us for the same behavior that we get mad at, well, they’ll just have to deal with it. Or, if they would just hurry up, or move over at least!

OK, I went off on a pretty big tangent, but you can see where it goes. Traffic, incidentally, is a great illustration for our pride. We get behind the wheel and often morph into someone vastly different than who we are face-to-face. But it all boils down to the same thing – we think we’re important! We think we are important and that we deserve respect. We take disrespect personally and it angers us.

Now, how did Christ feel?

This is a very tough pill even for a believer to swallow. We get so angry about petty things because we think ourselves of high value. We think ourselves worthy of respect, and maybe even praise.

We think that we are good people. Yet, we’re not.

We all sin and we all do embarrassing, faulty, shameful, reprehensible, perverted, deceptive things. If we are truly honest with ourselves, we can admit that we have all done things like that. Maybe we haven’t done all those things. Maybe we don’t do them that much or maybe not that bad. That doesn’t matter – we still do them.

We think that we are good because we want to be like God. We want to be so much like God that we want to act as our own god. I am not exempt from this behavior and likewise, other believers aren’t either. We all have the sin nature, and we all have the desire to act as our own god. We all have the desire to be like God, not to know God. We want to make the decisions, we want to show we are better, we want to be worthy of praise and respect, and we want to think that we are good.

Well, it’s not an easy think to accept, which is I think why so many don’t. Again, there are so many methodologies and theories to try to get around this because our pride blinds us to the fact that we even have it! We think we are good people, so we don’t want to see that we are, in fact, vile. Job, a man “proclaimed blameless and upright” by God Himself was overtaken with self-righteousness. When God confronted him on it, he said:

Behold, I am vile; what shall I answer you? I will lay my hand on my mouth. (Job 40:4, AKJV)

I think that one of the biggest things that keeps people from believing in Christ is accepting that they are actually not “good” people. But, Christians are no different. None of us are “good people”.  The reason we turn to Christ is simply that we don’t see ourselves as being good enough to enter into God’s presence out of anything that we can possibly do. We can’t say enough, do enough, serve enough – nothing that we do or say could ever possibly be enough to deem us worthy to enter God’s presence. There’s only one Person who is. His Son. His Son, who lived a perfect life on earth only to sacrifice Himself in our place. Because He knows we aren’t perfect, and He knows we aren’t good enough – and never could be. He knows that the only way that He can bring us into His presence is to provide the only worthy sacrifice – that is, Himself.

Why Does Salvation Have to be by Grace Alone, Through Faith Alone, in Christ Alone?

Whoever has the Son has life; whoever does not have the Son of God does not have life. (1 John 5:12, NIV)

These days, there are a lot of different views on salvation. Which one is correct? Maybe all of them are correct? Why can’t it be this way or that way? What makes one person or one group wrong, and the other group or person right? Why does any “one” have to be right – who says we all can’t be?

Can’t all religions just find God and eternal life through whatever way they deem necessary? Do you even have to ascribe to a specific religion? Don’t they all lead to the same God? What if you are a good person – why should you even have to believe in God?

Can’t we all just get along?

Well, the thing that sets Christianity apart from all the other religions is our way to get to God – though, many have tried to distort even that. So, here is the purely biblical way to get to God:

Salvation by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone.

It’s that simple! Now of course, that assumes the prerequisite (that you need saving in the first place). But, why does salvation have to come by grace alone?

Salvation by Grace Alone

Being justified as a gift by His grace through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus. (Romans 3:24, NASB)

Well, salvation comes by grace alone because that is what glorifies God, and because we need His grace. We use “grace” in a lot of different ways, and God’s grace is abundant in a variety of ways, but for this way the word is equivalent with a pardon. God’s grace for our salvation is like a pardon. It’s an act of forgiveness. It’s an act of mercy. Grace is receiving something good that we don’t deserve, and mercy is not receiving something bad that we do deserve. He is pardoning anything and everything we’ve done wrong – forgiving all our sins no matter how insurmountable they may be. He is pouring out both His grace and mercy on us through His love for us as a free gift to us. This glorifies God, and humbles us. This also ties in completely with the next step…

Why does salvation have to come by faith alone?

It’s funny (not in a ha-ha way!) how these 3 steps seem to be the most controversial, dicey ones for people. People often want to argue on steps 1 & 2 with almost the same argument. Other people want to twist the wording a little to suit their purpose. For example, some people have been known to say things like, “Well, God’s grace is what saves us through faith in the beginning.” The rest isn’t always immediately clear, but the implication is a lot different from grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone. There are many people who will say that they believe in Christ, and that they accept His method of salvation, or they accept Him as their Savior – but they won’t mean it the same way that I mean it here. We’ll get into that more another time, and I’ll link back to it here whenever I do.

In the meantime, why does this saving grace have to come by faith alone?

Salvation Through Faith Alone

I do not nullify the grace of God, for if righteousness were through the law, then Christ died for no purpose. (Galatians 2:21, ESV)

I think most people are probably familiar with Ephesians 2:8-9, which ends with “lest any man should boast”. Salvation comes through the free gift of the grace of God through faith in Jesus Christ. If God demanded that we earned our salvation, then His grace would be lessened. It would not glorify Him. To top of all that, people could walk around confidently proclaiming “I’m going to heaven because I’m righteous,” and God would, unthinkably, have to then honor that if they were. When I think about that even just to type it, it can’t sound any more ludicrous. And yet, people do believe like that.

Perhaps they wouldn’t be so confident about it. Perhaps they wouldn’t quite say it that way. Nevertheless, people all around the world say things like, “I’m a good person,” thus implying that they don’t do too many bad things or even things they consider very bad. They feel that their lack of bad behavior should qualify them to stand in front of our Almighty, Holy, Perfect God and be credited as at least “good enough”. This is where many people also get into that attitude of, “God’s grace is what allows us to do the works that will get us into heaven,” or some similar variety of that statement.

Going back to Ephesians:

For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast. (Ephesians 2:8-9, NKJV)

Here’s the simplest way to say this – no amount of our good works could ever be enough to save us. As previously mentioned, we need God’s grace which we receive by faith. Grace, by definition, cannot be earned or it is not grace. We cannot do it on our own and to say otherwise is preposterous.

So, why is it that we can only receive grace through faith in Christ?

Salvation In Christ Alone

Now the blood shall be a sign for you on the houses where you are. And when I see the blood, I will pass over you; and the plague shall not be on you to destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt. (Exodus 12:13, NKJV)

The verse above is from the final of the plagues on Egypt. God’s instruction to Israel was that each household was to take a young male lamb without spot or blemish. The lamb was to be killed before the whole congregation. Each household’s lamb would be then roasted and eaten with bitter herbs and unleavened bread, but first they had to paint the doorway with its blood. God said, “When I see the blood, I will pass over you.”

Now, there is nothing within all our human logic to say that this should make sense. People often don’t seem to view this as a “miracle”, but it is. There is no way to explain why some blood on a doorway would serve any purpose other than look strange to those around you. But this is a picture of Christ and His death. He is the Passover Lamb. He is the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.

In the same way that it makes no sense within our own way of thinking that some blood over a doorway would “cover us”, it doesn’t always make sense to people that the blood of another Man would save us from our own wrongs. But, God’s holiness requires death for sin. There’s no way around it. However, as Dr. Benjamin frequently points out, God doesn’t specify whose death that has to be! He is free to provide a substitute as He did for Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Every individual of humanity has “spot or blemish”, but not Christ. He is perfect, and sinless, and therefore He is the only one qualified to provide the acceptable sacrifice.

Now think back for a moment. What did the Israelites have to do in order to be saved from the plague? Did God tell them, “Now, be on your best behavior and find a lamb…”? No! In fact, remember, they didn’t get the Law until after they left Egypt. The Israelites had already complained against Moses and therefore, against God, for the Egyptians becoming harder on them after the plagues began. That was a sin, so it wasn’t that God was saving them because they were sinless. And Moses himself had murdered an Egyptian, so that was a sin – yet he was the one who was talking to God!

So at this point, we can see that all they had to do was believe what God was saying and act in faith by obeying God’s commands in that situation.

That’s it! In order to receive God’s grace, they had to believe what God said and act in faith, and then they were covered (saved) by the blood of the lamb.

Summary

Since Jesus Christ is the Lamb of God, and He was sacrificed for us, we have to believe in Him, and accept His death in our place. He is the only acceptable sacrifice since only God can meet God’s standard – therefore God Himself had to come down to take the punishment that we deserve. We don’t have to believe in Him, but if we choose not to accept His pardon then we are choosing to accept the punishment we rightly deserve.

The method of salvation has not changed – in order to receive God’s grace, we have to believe what God said (that we are sinners in need of a Savior) and act in faith (by acknowledging that we need to be saved and accepting Jesus Christ as our Lord and our Savior and our Sacrificial Lamb), and then we are saved by the blood of the Lamb.

The first Passover was a picture of the Passover to come, and that’s why we as Christians don’t need to celebrate the Passover feast as Israel was instructed to. The Passover is Christ. Everyone throughout history has been saved by grace through faith. They believed God, and they acted in faith, thereby receiving His grace and mercy.

At that time, the blood of the lamb was covering the doorway for the whole household. At this time, the blood of the Lamb covers us. At that time, it was to save their firstborn sons. At this time, it is to save ourselves.

This is why salvation must be by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone. As Pastor Mac Sauerlander said:

Nothing I did, said, will do, or will say can earn or improve my salvation.

As Pastor Sauerlander said (paraphrased), “If I give you a great, expensive gift, and then allow you to mow my lawn for a year as thanks, is it really a gift?”

Anything that we contribute would leave us unsure of our salvation and would rob Christ of His glory and the act of immense suffering He endured. God’s already given us the free gift of salvation in Jesus Christ, so why would He turn around and lessen His own act by requiring us to earn it in part?

Salvation by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone is what glorifies God and humbles us, as we realize that it can be no other way.